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We were given rare access to some of King's Cross

We were given rare access to some of King's Cross
04.11.2014
We were given rare access to some of King's Cross We were given rare access to some of King's Cross

We were given rare access to some of King’s Cross iconic buildings in their final throws of decay, before they are reborn through Argent’s grand redevelopment scheme.

Part of Lewis Cubitt’s grand King’s Cross station development, the Coal Drop buildings were built in the 1850s and 60s to transfer coal from rail wagons to road carts. The brick and cast iron structure originally carried four high-level railway tracks, from which wagons dropped coal into storage hoppers. From here the coal was loaded onto horse-drawn carts at ground level.

The coal drops were used to store goods for most of the 20th century, but by the 80s were being used as workshops, studios and, most infamously, night clubs. 

These shots were taken in the building once occupied by the legendary Bagley’s Warehouse, one of the most influential dance venues of the late 80s and early 90s, home to the first British warehouse parties and a catalyst for the ‘acid house’ movement.

We were given rare access to some of King's Cross We were given rare access to some of King's Cross We were given rare access to some of King's Cross